Tattoos for Beer Lovers:

Who doesn’t enjoy a nice cold beer at the end of a hard week or day, being able to sit out on a patio with friends or in a nice homey pub? Some people like beer so much that they’ve even chosen to immortalize their favourite drink on their skin as a tattoo!

New school Heineken by Craig Foster at Skin Werks
Old school brew and anchor by Siam Mais at Stay Cold Tattoo in Bangkok, Thailand

Many people go for a realistic depiction of their drink of choice, but neo-traditional, American traditional, new school, and black and grey are also popular.

A more neo-traditional beer and nature scene by Pablo Sinalma at Eclipse Tattoo in Barcelona
A realistic frosty mug by Melek Tastekin

Now for some cool facts; Did you know that beer is actually the oldest recorded recipe in the world? Ancient Egyptians first recorded their recipes on scrolls that date back to around 5000 BCE, and was brewed with ingredients such as dates, pomegranate, and other local fruits and herbs. This early form of beer was used mainly in religious ceremonies, and was controlled directly by the Pharaoh of the time.

Prisoner of beer by João Teixeira at Shark Tattoo Gallery
Beer, boobs, and bikes by Hubert Plaikner at Tintenfass Tattoo in Italy

While beer recipes were written down around 5000 BCE, it is believed that the ancient Mesopotamians were also brewing beer, around 10,000 BCE based on the malted barley and bowls with a beer-like residue that have been found by archaeologists. This beer eventually made its way over to Europe from the Middle East, and became an important part of life for nearly everyone. Northern Europe in particular brewed a lot of beer, in large part due to the crops like barley that they were able to grow. Beer even became a popular alternative to water because it was often cleaner to drink (lots of water at that time was pretty badly contaminated by human and animal waste). 

Neo-Traditional beer and hand by Marco Condor
Matching beer tattoos by Hécate at Le Coer Sauvage in lyon, France

Beer that is more similar to what you and I drink today was made in the early Middle Ages, combining hops and other herbs and spices to the barley that had already been used for a few hundred years. Around the year 1150, monks from Germany started using wild hops in beer and it caught on quick. It also acted as a natural preservative, allowing beer to last longer before needing to be drunk. While Pharaohs were the main brewers in Egypt thousands of years ago, monks were the main brewers in the Middle Ages, with almost all monasteries having an onsite brewery. Even today a number of Belgian monasteries still produce beer and rank as some of the best in the world. 

Hand poked beer carton by Simply Uglyful at Inkformal Tattoo
Photo realistic Stella Artois beer bottle by Maiko Only at Good Tattoo Studio in Nottingham, UK

What’s your favourite kind of beer?

Edited by Harrison R.

Build your own blog using the link below!

https://wordpress.com/alp/?aff=53531&cid=6423569

Kirin Tattoos:

There is a mythological creature from Japan known as a Kirin. It is known to have the body of a lion, scales like that of a fish, with deer antlers and hooves. 

Kirin with flames as a back piece by Marco Biondi at Freak Show Tattoo Studio in Cesena, Italy
Forearm Kirin and flames by Samantha Fung at 59 Tattoo in Hong Kong

Some people believe it may be based on a giraffe that may have been brought to China after one of the emperors expeditions to Africa.

Kirin half sleeve by Kan Stroker at Stroker Tattoo in Japan
Kirin and flames back by Horitsubaki in Fukui City, Japan

It is always seen as a harbinger of good luck or some kind of positive event that will happen, such as a period of abundance.

Black and grey Kirin by Dokgonoing
Black and grey Kirin back by Horitomo at State of Grace in California

Kirin are also meant to have an abundance of rui, a Buddhist concept that can be roughly translated to “serenity” and “prosperity.” This is visualized usually by flames surrounding the creature.

Kirin and flames on the leg by Victor Martins at Sacred Cartel
A bold thigh Kirin by Ian Det at Psycho Tattoo Studio in Rome

It is quite a popular creature in Japanese and East Asian tattooing in general, and it makes for a great stand alone piece or as part of a larger piece of work like a sleeve or even back piece. 

A healed back Kirin by Greg Kinnamon in Omaha Nebraska
Shoulder Kirin by Hide Ichibay at Tokyo Three Tides

Edited by Harrison R.

Build your own blog using the link below!

Artist of the Month: Tony Torvis

Tony Torvis is the owner of Mortem Tattoo in Montréal, Canada. His work consists of traditional old school designs without colour, making his clients look like the brilliant black and white photographs of days long past.

Full sleeve with hand
Battle Royale on the stomach

Tony’s work is reminiscent of the great tattooers of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s but is still recognizable as a Tony Torvis piece. 

Full back featuring a dragon and ladies
Beautiful chest piece

Expect crisp clean lines and bold, powerful motifs such as dragons, snakes, lady heads, portraits, and flowers. There is original flash in the shop to choose from, or you can bring your own idea to him, or re-create an old piece of historical flash.

Pharaohs cats as part of a back piece
Angelic ladies

Tony’s Instagram page is full of both large and small scale work, from chest pieces to full backs, sleeves, and little filler pieces.

Full front torso, some healed some fresh
Bert Grimm sintered chest piece

You’ll also notice from his Instagram page that the majority of clients are repeat customers. Tony’s tattoos are kind of like chips, you just can’t stop at one! Mortem tattoo is a must visit shop if you’re in the area, and there are other brilliant artists working there as well.

Two sleeves in progress
Full back featuring ladies

Edited by Harrison R.

Build your own blog using the link below!

https://wordpress.com/alp/?aff=53531&cid=6423569