Golden Age of Disney Tattoos

In this blog post, the Golden Age of Disney refers specifically to Disney’s animated films and does not include live action.

Snow White by Jordan Baker.
Thumper by Camille Gualtieri.

The Golden Age of Disney spans from 1937-1942 and includes Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo, and Bambi.

Jiminy Cricket by Nicole Zulianello.
Black and grey Snow White by Piotrek Taton on Grace Neutral.

Despite the name “Golden Age” this was actually a quite unsuccessful chapter in terms of financial gain, other than Snow White and Dumbo. In fact, Dumbo was originally supposed to be a short film but was made longer to make up for the financial losses suffered by Fantasia.

Dumbo by Silvia Damiano.
Figaro the cat done by Emilia Rose.

The films created in this time were all overseen by Walt himself, and helped cement Disney as a leader in animation.

Bambi and Thumper by Jordan Baker.
Dumb and his mother by Mason Stoner.

While Disney films are generally regarded as mainly happy and upbeat, these films all tell quite dark stories and actually contain some quite frightening scenes, especially for the young audiences they were aimed at. I know scenes in Snow White and Pinocchio certainly scared me as a child.

Poison apple from Snow White done by Eugenios Simopoulos.
A creative Thumper portrait by Nicole Robinson.

As tattoos, Disney animation are almost entirely done in new school style, with some realism and more experimental styles also making the cut.

Pinocchio transforming into a donkey done by Gold Marie.

I found no shortage of tattoos from this era of Disney, other than Fantasia, of which I only found tattoos from the newer 2000’s version which will be seen in a later post.

Dumbo and his mother by Mae La Roux.

Which Golden Age film is your favourite?

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Star Wars Tattoos:

May the fourth be with you!

Yoda and baby Yoda done by Ash Lewis in a realistic black and grey style.

There’s no denying that Star Wars is one of the most popular film and television franchises ever made. Here are some Star Wars facts and cool tattoos to help you celebrate today.

Darth Vader done by Ufoo Tattoo.

Akira Kurosawa’s 1958 film “The Hidden Fortress” was one of many influences on George Lucas when he was first creating the story for Star Wars. Particularly the fact that both stories are told first from the point of view of lowly characters. The word Jedi is also derived from the Japanese word “Jidaigeki” which refers to the types of films directors like Kurasawa would make.

Cartoon Leia done by Allison Riot.

Harrison Ford wasn’t actually auditioning for the movies at all. George Lucas had him brought in to feed lines to other actors that were auditioning, but liked how he did it so much that he was offered the part of Han Solo.

Black and grey Darth Vader half sleeve done by Jeebby Aponte Quinones.

Orson Welles was almost the voice of Darth Vader, but that was changed when Lucas thought his voice would be too recognizable.

Gangster Chewbacca done by French Xav at Exile Tattoo Parlour.

Robert Englund (most fameus for playing the infamous Freddy Krueger) convinced a young Mark Hamill to audition for the movies after he was rejected for the role of Han Solo.

Luke’s severed hand and his lightsaber done by Chris Hatch.

Early shots of the millennium falcon escaping through an asteroid belt features potatoes spray painted to look like asteroids.

Darth Maul done by Bobby Tripp.

Star Wars features one of the misquoted lines in cinematic history. “Luke, I am your father.” Sound familiar? Well, it’s incorrect. Darth Vader actually says “No, I am your father.”

Kylo Ren and Rey done by Yesenia Concepcion.

Jabba Hutt was so large that he had to be puppeteered by seven people.

Realistic Jar Jar Binks done by Khail Aitken.

The Saga almost ended with Luke donning the Vader mask, but the idea was scrapped as Lucas wanted a happier ending.

Darth Vader and Kylo Ren portrait done by Jordan Baker.

Harrison Ford had been advocating for Han Solo’s death for about 30 years, and he finally got it in “The Force Awakens.”

Which Star Wars movie is your favourite?

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Werewolf Tattoos:

The werewolf myth dates back thousands of years, in numerous cultures; but it became most popular between the 16th and 19th centuries. These stories grew so popular that it seemed almost every town in Europe had its own werewolf tale. Books such as Discours de la Lycanthropie published in 1599, described werewolves as “men so denatured, that they have made bastards of their first origin, leaving this divine form, and transforming themselves into such an impure, cruel and savage beast.”

Matt Curzon Tattoo EMPIRE :: Melbourne, Australia
Brilliant neo traditional sleeve by Matt Curzon at Tattoo EMPIRE in Melbourne, Australia.
Dan Gagné LOVELESS 4169 St-Denis Montreal
Classic American traditional werewolf and moon by Dan Gagné at Loveless tattoo in Montreal.

Another term for werewolf is lycan. Lycanthropy, then, is the change of man or woman into the form of a wolf, either through magical means, so as to enable him or her to gratify the taste for human flesh, or through judgment of the gods in punishment for some great offence, as put by Sabine Baring-Gould in his 1865 book The Book of Werewolves.

darnellwaine los angeles
Fantastic forearm piece by Darnell Waine in Los Angeles.
Chris Ramirez
Crisp half sleeve by Chris Ramirez.

When sideshows were a popular part of circus life, people with hypertrichosis were often branded as werewolves.

paul acker
Absolutely terrifyingly realistic werewolf by Paul Acker at The Séance Tattoo Parlor in Bensalem.
jojo-713518

Popular werewolf movies include An American Werewolf in London 1981, The Wolf Man 1941, The Curse of the Werewolf 1961, and The Wolfman 2010.

Lea Vendetta
Black and Grey Wolf Man portrait by Lea Vendetta.
Javier Rodriguez Tattooist Resident Artist at🔹IMMORTAL ART STUDIO american werewolf
Fantastic realistic and dark werewolf from An American Werewolf in London by Javier Rodriguez Immortal Art Studio.
Joe K Worrall-HORROR ARTIST HORROR and portrait ARTIST🕳Horror nerd 🎃Horror collector🕳My family 👨‍👩‍👦‍👦Heart & arrow tattoo studio, U.K. american werewolf
Haunting werewolf from An American Werewolf in London by Joe K Worrall in the U.K.
Russell Van Schaick Orlando, FL World Famous Tattoo remus lupin
Professor Remus Lupin from Harry Potter in the form of his werewolf, done in watercolor and sketch style by Russell Van Schaick Orlando, FL World Famous Tattoo.
Matt Perlman Aces High Tattoos West Palm Beach Fl american werewolf in london
Terrifying realistic black and grey piece also from An American Werewolf in London by Matt Perlman Aces High Tattoos West Palm Beach Fl.
Elen Soul
A big and bloody wolf man by Elen Soul.

As a tattoo, werewolves are often done in black and grey style, realism, neo traditional, and American traditional.

Chris Thompson Painter, Tattooer at 522 Tattoo
Skeleton and werewolf by Chris Thompson at 522 Tattoo.
Good Fortune Abq NM by Alex Werder
Dark werewolf head with red moon by Alex Werder at Good Fortune Tattoo.
Hilary Fisher White in Brooklyn
Angry looking werewolf stealing a woman away, by Hilary Fisher White in Brooklyn.
James Armstrong Holy Mountain Tattoo
Blackwork werewolf with crescent moon and bones done by James Armstrong at Holy Mountain Tattoo.
Jan Veldman I work at Gypsy Cat Tattoos 1-353 Provencher, Winnipeg
Big and bold neo traditional werewolf head done by Jan Veldman at Gypsy Cat Tattoos in Winnipeg.
Jonathan Penchoff
Midway transformation piece by Jonathan Penchoff.
Jordan Baker at penny black tattoo
Fierce and realistic looking werewolf head by Jordan Baker at Penny Black Tattoo.
noelle_lamonica black cobra tattoo club
Werewolf looking to party done by Noelle Lamonica at Black Cobra Tattoo Club.

What’s your favorite werewolf movie?